This is Sex Truck.
Kik: ndestrukt

12th July 2014

Photo reblogged from gilbogarbage with 5 notes

9th July 2014

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CTA graffiti.

CTA graffiti.

4th July 2014

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@profmcpimp can’t see shit.

@profmcpimp can’t see shit.

1st July 2014

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"Broken down. No help found. Left by the side of the road."

"Broken down. No help found. Left by the side of the road."

28th June 2014

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Pentaject has a better way.

Pentaject has a better way.

25th June 2014

Photo with 3 notes

"It’s a painting of Ray Charles doing Thriller in front of the American flag. My favorite painting ever." - @johannaisaviking

"It’s a painting of Ray Charles doing Thriller in front of the American flag. My favorite painting ever." - @johannaisaviking

25th June 2014

Photo reblogged from Babes & Sucklings with 231 notes

Source: rimbaudwasademonchild

25th June 2014

Photo reblogged from Steve Niles Tumblr with 167 notes

24th June 2014

Photo with 1 note

You cannot be serious.

You cannot be serious.

23rd June 2014

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They wanted a boy named Bryan. That’s not what they got.

They wanted a boy named Bryan. That’s not what they got.

22nd June 2014

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Laying pipe.

Laying pipe.

21st June 2014

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Rain delay at work. Lightning storm in Evanston.

Rain delay at work. Lightning storm in Evanston.

18th June 2014

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@profmcpimp before the first storm hit this morning at work.

@profmcpimp before the first storm hit this morning at work.

17th June 2014

Photo reblogged from Darlings & Dumbbells with 68,936 notes

Source: thothes

17th June 2014

Photoset reblogged from cat with 90,951 notes

The Last Japanese Mermaids 

For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.

In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence.

Source: eleanasound